Causes of Temporary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence is the inability to control the flow of urine from the bladder. Urinary incontinence in men can be permanent or temporary, depending on the underlying cause. There are several possible causes of temporary incontinence, including:

  • Alcohol
  • Overhydration
  • Caffeine
  • Bladder irritation
  • Medications
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Constipation

Alcohol and Urinary Incontinence

Alcohol stimulates the bladder, resulting in a frequent urge to urinate. It also acts as a diuretic, which increases urine production. Frequent urges combined with an increase in urine production can lead to urge incontinence or overflow incontinence.

Overhydration and Urinary Incontinence

Overhydration (drinking a lot of fluid in a short amount of time) increases urine production. When your bladder is full, it is more difficult to control and more likely to leak.

Caffeine and Urinary Incontinence

As with alcohol, caffeine stimulates the bladder, resulting in a frequent urge to urinate. It also acts as a diuretic, which increases urine production. Frequent urges combined with an increase in urine production can lead to urge incontinence or overflow incontinence.

Bladder Irritation and Urinary Incontinence

When your bladder is irritated it contracts, causing a frequent and urgent need to urinate. Bladder irritation can be caused by infection or by eating or drinking certain foods or beverages. Foods and drinks that can cause bladder irritation may include:

  • Alcohol
  • Caffeinated drinks
  • Carbonated drinks
  • Citrus fruits
  • Spicy foods

Medications and Urinary Incontinence

Certain medications can sometimes cause urinary incontinence in men. For example, medications that are used to treat heart disease or high blood pressure can act as diuretics, increasing urine production. Muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and sedatives can relax the muscles of your bladder, contributing to urine leakage. Sleeping pills can keep you from waking at night when you need to urinate.

Urinary Tract Infection and Incontinence

Urinary tract infection can irritate your bladder, which can lead to a frequent and urgent need to urinate.

Constipation and Urinary Incontinence

Because your bladder and the rectum are so close together, stool that is built up in the rectum can put pressure on your bladder. That pressure can cause your bladder to not fill as it should, to contract when it shouldn’t, and to not empty completely when you urinate.

For more information on causes of temporary incontinence, contact Dr. Leroy Jones, urologist San Antonio, TX.